Curing Your Golf Slice Is Easier Than You Think

According to a poll by Golf.com, more than 70% of golfers say the slice is their number one problem. And many golf experts estimate that up to 85% of players slice or hook the ball. Needless to say, there is a lot of attention paid to – and plenty of money thrown at – curing the dreaded golf slice. Practically all golf equipment manufacturers claim to make the ball fly straighter.

Golfers spend a fortune on lessons, DVDs, swing trainers, self-correcting balls and anti-slice drivers just to see even the slightest improvement to their slice.

Even as golf instructors say “Cure Your Slice in 3 Simple Steps,” the actual instructions are much more complicated: “Your swing is inside-out, or outside-in; you’re twisting you wrist; your arms are too rigid (or loose); your stance, grip, backswing, downswing, or something is wrong, wrong, wrong.” When you count up all the “pointers,” golf instructors indicate over 25 different factors that cause you to slice.

These experts ignore the fundamental reason any of these errors causes a curved flight path. That is: If your clubface hits the ball at the wrong angle, it creates friction between the clubface and the ball resulting in sidespin. That sidespin is the reason you slice.

So, the ultimate cure is pretty simple. Reduce friction off the clubface and you reduce your slice. But, will any old slick substance work?

As a former high stakes golf gambler, I can’t believe that more players don’t know what old golf pros and high stakes gamblers have known forever. Wipe petroleum jelly or lip balm on your clubface and you will hit the ball longer and straighter every time. Everyone in the game calls it “greasing” their club (even Lee Trevino mentioned it on David Feherty’s new show). But using traditional “grease” on your clubface is a pain in the butt.

“Grease” needs to be applied before every shot and makes a mess of your head covers and towels, and, worst of all, gets on your grips and hands.

Fortunately, there are new alternatives to “grease” that don’t have those problems. With the advent of nanotechnologies, nanopolymer coatings can reduce sidespin better than any traditional “grease” used in golf, but without actually being greasy. Power Straight®, the original Anti-Slice Golf Club Coating©, is a patented nanopolymer that is scientifically engineered to do just that.

While Power Straight® is completely undetectable to the eye and touch, each application lasts a full round and reduces a slice or hook up to 72%. It absolutely works every time. Unlike traditional golf “greases,” it’ll remain your secret since you don’t need to apply it before every shot.

I’m not advocating using Power Straight® for tournament play (but I’m not here to police the rules of golf).

However, according to multiple independent studies, few recreational golfers even know, let alone play by, the strict USGA rules. Honestly, I don’t believe they should. It’s the equivalent of expecting a flag football game go by NFL rules or a game of pick-up basketball using NBA rules. It’s nonsense and completely unreasonable. Guys go out in a foursome and make up their own rules a lot of times. Hell, I’ve even given a guy a drive and a kick off the tee box before. The only rules that should really matter are moving a ball (in play), dropping a ball (that was hit out of bounds or lost), or penciling in the wrong score.

The average golfer is on the course to have a good time. It’s a recreational sport they use for relaxation, exercise, friendly competition, or just as an excuse to get out of the house. For those players, using Power Straight’s anti-slice coating means the difference between a day of frustration looking for your ball or a day having a good time. For the rest of the players on the course, it means faster play because they’re not waiting on you while you’re in the woods.

And, just to be clear, I’m not advocating that you stop working on your golf skills. Even when you use Power Straight®, proper form will help improve your slice even more.

My personal opinion is that beginners and high-handicap players should concentrate more on their short game rather than their drive. At the driving range, too often you see beginners only practicing with their driver, when they should be hitting a lot more wedges, working on a consistent punch shot (that can get you out of most trouble), and spending most of their practice time on the putting green. Improving your short game is where you’re going to see the most improvement in your score.

Once you’ve mastered your short game, you can work on all the intricacies of the perfect drive. Until then, just go out and smash the ball and let Power Straight® help you gain more accuracy and hit a lot more fairways. Spend your time thinking about your next shot instead of searching for your ball.



Source by Daniel R Sanchez

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